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Today in History

Today is Wednesday, April 16, the 106th day of 2014. There are 259 days left in the year.

Man charged with hoax near marathon finish line

A member of the bomb squad inspects an object after a controlled detonation at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston, Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Police have blown up two unattended backpacks found near the Boston Marathon's finish line on Tuesday. They say they've taken a man into custody in connection with them. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer) BOSTON (AP) — Police say a man taken into custody near the Boston Marathon finish line had a rice cooker in his backpack and is being charged with possession of a hoax device.


BOJ Kuroda says watching stock price moves carefully

Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda said on Wednesday that he did not think the central bank's extraordinary monetary stimulus was fuelling speculative moves in the market, although he added he will monitor stock price moves carefully. "Stock prices have risen compared with before new policies under 'Abenomics' were implemented. Market volatility may have heightened too, but that hasn't had a big negative impact on the economy," Kuroda told a parliamentary session. "I won't comment directly on stock price moves but hope to pay close attention to stock market moves," he said.

GM to ask bankruptcy court for lawsuit protection

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors revealed in court filings late Tuesday that it will soon ask a federal bankruptcy judge to shield the company from legal claims for conduct that occurred before its 2009 bankruptcy.

New York police disband unit that spied on Muslims

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2013, file photo, visitors socialize after a Jumu'ah prayer service outside the Islamic Society of Bay Ridge and mosque in the Brooklyn borough of New York. The New York Police Department targeted the mosque as a part of a terrorism enterprise investigation beginning in 2003, spying on it for years. On Tuesday, April 15, 2014, the NYPD confirmed that it has disbanded the special unit that operated that surveillance program. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File) NEW YORK (AP) — A special New York Police Department unit that sparked controversy by tracking the daily lives of Muslims in an effort to detect terror threats has been disbanded, police officials said Tuesday.


Instant View: China GDP growth slows in first quarter

China's annual economic growth slowed to an 18-month low of 7.4 percent in the January to March quarter of 2014, just above market expectations, confirming the world's second-largest economy lost momentum at the start of 2014. The government has already taken some steps to stabilize the economy, and has said that this year's growth target of 7.5 percent is approximate. KEY POINTS Q1 GDP +7.4 pct y/y (forecast +7.3 pct, previous qtr +7.7 pct) Q1 GDP +1.4 pct q/q (forecast +1.4 pct) March industrial output +8.8 pct y/y (forecast +9.0 pct) March retail sales +12.2 pct y/y (forecast +12.1 pct) Jan-March fixed-asset investment +17.6 pct y/y (forecast +18.1 pct) COMMENTARY TOMMY XIE, ECONOMIST, OVERSEA-CHINESE BANKING CORPORATION, SINGAPORE: "Judging from quarter-on-quarter reading, the 1.4 percent has been the slowest since China officially released the quarter-on-quarter reading from the fourth quarter 2010. "Given China has already rolled out the mini fiscal stimulus back in March, it may take some time for the fixed investment to rebound from the low of 17.6 percent year-on-year in the first quarter.

Asia shares rise, shrug off slower China growth

People stand at a barricade at the regional administration building that they had seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Several government buildings have fallen to mobs of Moscow loyalists in recent days as unrest spreads across the east of the country. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky) TOKYO (AP) — Shares rose Wednesday in Asia, led by Japan's Nikkei 225 index, as investors largely shrugged off news that China's economy grew at its slowest pace in 24 years in the first quarter.


Detroit makes deal with retired cops, firefighters

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, file photo, Detroit Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Detroit. The city of Detroit has reached a deal with retired police officers and firefighters that would preserve current pensions but trim annual cost-of-living payments — the first major agreement with retirees in the bankruptcy case, mediators announced Tuesday, April 15, 2014. A spokesman for Orr, who took the city into bankruptcy last summer, didn't immediately respond to a message Tuesday from The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File) DETROIT (AP) — The city of Detroit reached a deal with a group of retired police officers and firefighters that would protect pensions but trim annual cost-of-living payments — the first major agreement with retirees in the bankruptcy case, mediators announced Tuesday.


China economic growth slows to 18-month low in first quarter

Shipping container is lifted by a crane at a port in Lianyungang By Adam Rose BEIJING (Reuters) - China's economy grew at its slowest pace in 18 months in the first quarter of 2014, official data showed on Wednesday, with signs of waning momentum already prompting limited government action to steady the world's second-largest economy. Authorities have ruled out major stimulus to fight short-term dips in growth, and some analysts think the economy will continue to lose momentum into the middle of the year. It was China's slowest annual growth since the third quarter of 2012, when growth was also 7.4 percent. "I don't think they're going to announce any further significant measures to support growth." Beijing has announced some modest measures, such as tax cuts for small firms and speeding up some investment in rail projects, to try to steady growth around its target of 7.5 percent without disrupting plans to restructure the economy.


Asian shares offer muted cheer to China growth

Eemployee of a foreign exchange trading company works behind monitors in Tokyo By Wayne Cole SYDNEY (Reuters) - Asian share markets were mostly in the black on Wednesday after China reported economic growth a touch above forecasts, a relief for investors who had feared a much weaker outcome. China's economy grew 7.4 percent in the first quarter, from a year earlier, pipping forecasts of 7.3 percent. "But the problem is that the government has to resort to stimulus repeatedly to support the economy (which) means it's having a hard time to unleash new growth drivers." The relief rippled through regional markets with Japan's Nikkei adding to early gains to be up 2.2 percent. Yahoo Inc jumped 10 percent thanks to strong results from Alibaba Group Holding Ltd, the Chinese e-commerce company in which Yahoo holds a 24 percent stake.


HKMA steps up supervision of banks' credit risk management

A security guard walks past a directory board of Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) in Hong Kong By Jacqueline Poh HONG KONG, April 16 (RLPC) - The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) is stepping up its supervision of Hong-Kong-based banks' credit risk management by asking banks to show stable funding requirements and agree to regular onsite examinations of credit underwriting processes and stress-testing, the HKMA said in a statement. These measures come after a steep rise in offshore lending to Chinese mainland companies by Hong Kong-based banks. Chinese onshore companies borrowed HK$2.276 trillion of customer loans at the end of 2013, excluding HK$313 billion of trade finance loans, according to the HKMA. "The increase in Hong Kong banking sector's mainland-related lending is a natural consequence of the growth of the mainland economy and development of mainland corporates," said HKMA, which reinforces Hong Kong's role as a significant international financial center.


China statistics bureau: Q1 GDP growth still within targeted range

BEIJING (Reuters) - China's economic growth in the first quarter was within range, and the employment situation remained stable and inflation under control, the statistics bureau said on Wednesday. "Although economic growth slowed in the first quarter, in general, it stayed in a reasonable range," said bureau spokesman Sheng Laiyun. The comments came at a media briefing following the release of data showing the economy grew 7.4 percent in January-March, slightly above expectations for 7.3 percent growth. (Reporting by Xiaoyi Shao, Aileen Wang and Jonathan Standing; Editing by Shri Navaratnam)

Solemn tributes mark Boston Marathon bombing

Olivia Savarino, center, hugs Christelle Pierre-Louis, left, as Callie Benjamin, right, looks on near the finish line of the Boston Marathon during ceremonies on Boylston Street, Tuesday, April 15, 2014, in Boston. Savarino and Benjamin were working at the Forum restaurant when a bomb went off in front of the building on April 15, 2013. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) BOSTON (AP) — Survivors, first responders and relatives of those killed in the Boston Marathon bombing marked the anniversary Tuesday with tributes that combined sorrow over the loss of innocent victims with pride over the city's resilience in the face of a terror attack.


China's growth slows to 24-year low of 7.4 percent

BEIJING (AP) — China's economic growth slowed to a 24-year low of 7.4 percent in the first quarter, raising the risk of job losses and a potential impact on its trading partners.

Fed should beef up low-rate vows, two officials say

A view shows the Federal Reserve building in Washington By Alicia Underlee Nelson and Richard Valdmanis FARGO, North Dakota/BANGOR, Maine (Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Reserve ought not to raise interest rates until the economy is much closer to full strength, two of the Fed's most dovish policymakers said on Tuesday. "If you commit to keeping rates low even as the recovery is proceeding, even as we continue to recover, I think people have a sense, the Fed has the recovery's back," Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank President Narayana Kocherlakota said at North Dakota State University. "And that's the message that I think we need to do a better job of promoting." If households and businesses believe the Fed is close to raising rates, they may decide to save rather than to spend, inhibiting recovery, Kocherlakota said. But because inflation is so low, he said, the Fed can afford to remain accommodative even while the recovery strengthens, and it will likely need to raise rates only gradually when the time comes.


Boston police destroy 2 backpacks at marathon site

A member of the bomb squad inspects an object after a controlled detonation at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in Boston, Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Police have blown up two unattended backpacks found near the Boston Marathon's finish line on Tuesday. They say they've taken a man into custody in connection with them. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer) BOSTON (AP) — Police have blown up two unattended backpacks found near the Boston Marathon's finish line. They say they've taken a man into custody in connection with them.


Delta evacuates jet in Atlanta due to cabin smoke

ATLANTA (AP) — Passengers were evacuated from a domestic Delta Air Lines flight Tuesday after a "smoky odor" was detected in the cockpit and main cabin due to what was later determined to be a burned-out fan.

Bill signed allowing surprise inspections of Arizona abortion clinics

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer makes a statement saying she vetoed the controversial SB1062 bill at the Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix By David Schwartz PHOENIX (Reuters) - Arizona Governor Jan Brewer on Tuesday signed into a law a bill allowing state health authorities to conduct surprise inspections of abortion clinics without first obtaining a warrant, handing another victory to abortion foes. The Republican-backed bill, which gained final legislative approval from the state Senate last week, removes a provision from state law requiring a judge to approve any spot inspections conducted at the nine clinics in Arizona licensed to perform abortions. No other medical facilities in the state require such a warrant for unannounced inspections. "This legislation will ensure that the Arizona Department of Health Services has the authority to appropriately protect the health and safety of all patients," gubernatorial spokesman Andrew Wilder said in announcing that Brewer, a Republican, had signed the measure.


BOJ Kuroda maintains positive view on economy

Bank of Japan Governor Kuroda speaks during a news conference at the BOJ headquarters in Tokyo By Leika Kihara TOKYO (Reuters) - Bank of Japan Governor Haruhiko Kuroda on Wednesday affirmed its upbeat view of the economy, even as global financial markets wobble, stressing that growth will pick up around mid-year as the sting of a sales tax hike fades. Price rises will broaden as the economy continues gradually to improve, Kuroda added, reiterating his view that Japan is making headway towards the central bank's price goal of 2 percent inflation in about a year's time. Kuroda's comments came a day after he met Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to discuss the economy, which drew some market speculation the BOJ may come under pressure to expand stimulus as a rebound in the yen and sliding Japanese share prices cloud the outlook for the world's third-largest economy. BOJ officials have repeatedly expressed confidence that this month's increase in the national sales tax will not derail the economy or prevent inflation from hitting the central bank's 2 percent target.


Police: GPS helped solve, didn't deter killings

CORRECTS FIRST NAME TO STEVEN-This combination of undated photos from the Megan's Law website shows suspects, Steven Dean Gordon, 45, left, and Franc Cano, 27, who were arrested on Friday, April 11, 2014, on suspicion of killing four women in Orange County, Calif. Anaheim police said detectives in Santa Ana and Anaheim launched a joint investigation after the naked body of Jarrae Nykkole Estepp, 21, was found in the conveyor belt of a recycling plant last month. The probe led detectives to connect the men to her slaying, and the disappearance of three women who frequented a Santa Ana neighborhood known for drug dealing and prostitution. (AP Photo/Megan's Law) SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — GPS technology helped police link two convicted sex offenders to the rapes and killings of at least four women in California, but the mother of one victim said Tuesday that the monitoring system should have done more to prevent the crimes in the first place.


Hundreds of earthquakes strike central Idaho, rattling nerves

By Laura Zuckerman SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) - Hundreds of low-level and medium-sized earthquakes have struck central Idaho since last month, puzzling geologists who wonder whether the ruptures portend a much larger temblor to come or are merely the rumblings of a seismic fault previously thought to be dormant. The recent earthquake swarm, beginning on March 24 and climaxed by a 4.9 magnitude tremor on Saturday, has produced no reports of injuries or severe damage but has rattled nerves in a region where Idaho's most powerful known quake, measured at 6.9, killed two children in 1983. Saturday's earthquake was the strongest recorded in the state since 2005 and was followed on Monday by a magnitude 4.4 event that struck 10 miles north of the small ranching community of Challis, Idaho, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The likelihood of a severe earthquake coming on the heels of the recent swarm is low, but much is perplexing about the series of tremors, said Bill Phillips, a geologist with the Idaho Geological Survey at the University of Idaho.

Two incompatible gun ballot measures lead in Washington state

The groups Mayors Against Illegal Guns and Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America hold a news conference in Washington By Jonathan Kaminsky OLYMPIA, Washington (Reuters) - Two incompatible ballot measures on background checks for gun buyers in Washington state enjoy majority support in a poll released on Tuesday, but the one advancing stricter gun controls is more popular. They are the latest touchstones in a longstanding fight over background checks on gun buyers. The debate hinges on whether their expansion constitutes a common-sense approach to keeping guns away from criminals and the mentally unstable or a first step in broader restrictions on gun ownership. Initiative 594 would require all firearm sales, including those at gun shows and conducted online, to be predicated on a background check of the buyer.


10 Things to Know for Wednesday

FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2014, file photo, a group of people hold signs protesting the New York Police Department’s program of infiltrating and informing on Muslim communities during a rally near police headquarters in New York. On Tuesday, April 15, 2014, the NYPD confirmed it disbanded the special intelligence unit that monitored Muslim communities in New York and New Jersey. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File) Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:


Voices of gratitude, defiance at Boston bombing memorial

Dignitaries, including U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, survivors and first responders participate in a flag raising ceremony at the finish line in Boston By Scott Malone BOSTON (Reuters) - Vice President Joe Biden, other leaders and survivors of the Boston Marathon bombing shared messages of thanks and defiance on Tuesday at a tribute to the three people killed and 264 wounded in the attack exactly one year ago. From Patrick Downes, who lost a leg when a pair of homemade bombs ripped through the crowd at the race's finish line, to Biden, speakers recalled how police officers, spectators and others on the scene reacted immediately to help the wounded amid the chaos on April 15, 2013. Former Boston Mayor Thomas Menino, who managed the response to the attack during the final year of his two decades in office, recalled the struggles of the families of Martin Richard, 8, Krystle Campbell, 29, and Chinese national Lu Lingzi, 23, who died in the largest mass-casualty attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001.


Boston police investigate 2 backpacks, clear area

A backpack that was left unattended on Boylston Street at the finish line of the Boston Marathon is pictured BOSTON (AP) — Police say they've taken a man into custody in connection with two unattended backpacks found at the Boston Marathon finish line.


Intel reports lower 1Q net income, higher revenue

FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2014 file photo, Mooly Eden, senior vice president and perceptual computing general manager from Intel, talks to the media during the Intel news conference at the International Consumer Electronics Show, in Las Vegas. Intel Corp. reports quarterly earnings after the market close on Tuesday, April 15, 2014. (AP Photo/Jack Dempsey, File) NEW YORK (AP) — Intel's earnings fell in the first three months of the year amid a continued slump in the worldwide PC market, but revenue grew slightly because of solid demand for tablet processors and its data center services.


Judge lets conviction of Arkansas treasurer stand

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — A federal judge Tuesday upheld the corruption conviction of Arkansas' former treasurer, saying prosecutors proved she illegally influenced interstate commerce and rejecting her argument that the case against her should have been heard by state authorities.

Brothers hurt in marathon bombing retrace route

BOSTON (AP) — Two Boston-area brothers who each lost a right leg in the Boston Marathon bombings have retraced the marathon route on the anniversary in a relay walk-and-ride with relatives and friends.

UK inflation hits new four-year low, house prices continue rise

A woman passes racks of greetings cards displayed in a shop in London Chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne said the data showed his coalition government policies were bringing greater economic security, and his civil servants have said that on some measures, living standards are already rising. But his Labour Party opposite number, Ed Balls, said the CPI data failed to capture rapidly rising house prices, and that tax and benefit changes since 2010 meant that the average household was almost 1,000 pounds a year worse off. House prices are rising at their fastest since June 2010, up 9.1 percent on the year, according to ONS data released alongside the CPI figures. Prices in London are up 17.7 percent, the biggest jump since July 2007.


Texas candidate faces thorny death penalty choice

FILE - In this March 4, 2014, file photo, Texas Republican gubernatorial candidate General Greg Abbott, left, talks to supporters in San Antonio. Both Abbott and his Democratic opponent Wendy David are courting conservative voters and both support capital punishment. But Abbott is due, as attorney general, to issue a legal decision on whether the public can know where Texas gets its executions drugs. It's a dilemma that could put him in a difficult position with some voters _ and in a strange twist, one that Davis can't easily exploit. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File) AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The death penalty is like gun rights in Texas politics: Candidates don't dare get in the way of either. But Republican Greg Abbott, the favorite to succeed Gov. Rick Perry, must soon make a decision as attorney general that could disrupt the nation's busiest death chamber.


City Council approves street repairs

City Council members gave preliminary approval to a batch of projects to kick off this summer's record-setting construction season.

New York police end Muslim surveillance program

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2013, file photo, visitors socialize after a Jumu'ah prayer service outside the Islamic Society of Bay Ridge and mosque in the Brooklyn borough of New York. The New York Police Department targeted the mosque as a part of a terrorism enterprise investigation beginning in 2003, spying on it for years. On Tuesday, April 15, 2014, the NYPD confirmed that it has disbanded the special unit that operated that surveillance program. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File) NEW YORK (AP) — A special New York Police Department unit that sparked controversy by tracking the daily lives of Muslims in an effort to detect terror threats has been disbanded, police officials said Tuesday.


NY City police disband unit that monitored Muslim communities: report

New York Police Department officers stand outside of a midtown Manhattan office building after evacuating workers that had been overcome by fumes in New York The New York Police Department has disbanded a surveillance unit that targeted and monitored Muslim communities, The New York Times reported on Tuesday. The unit, which began in 2003, has been largely inactive since the incoming Police Commissioner William Bratton took over the department in January, and its detectives have been reassigned, the report said. "Understanding certain local demographics can be a useful factor when assessing the threat information that comes into New York City virtually on a daily basis," Stephen Davis, the NYPD's chief spokesman, was quoted as saying. "In the future, we will gather that information, if necessary, through direct contact between the police precincts and the representatives of the communities they serve," he said.


City council approves mutual aid agreement

The city of Amarillo is renewing its commitment to giving and receiving emergency-response aid on a regional basis.

City Council Votes to Annex Property of Proposed Wind Farm

The City of Corpus Christi may have effectively killed a proposed wind farm project in the Chapman Ranch area, just outside the city limits, in a single vote at Tuesday's council meeting.

Congress is giving states the transportation blues

This photo taken April 14, 2014 shows Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx speaking to the media and local government officials about federal transportation funding at the Montgomery County Commissioner's office in Dayton, Ohio. On the road in a tour bus this week, Foxx is urging Congress to quickly approve legislation to pay for highway and transit programs amid warnings that the U.S. government’s Highway Trust Fund is nearly broke. If allowed to run dry, that could threaten to set back or shut down projects across the country, force widespread layoffs of construction workers and delay needed repairs and improvements. (AP Photo/Skip Peterson) DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — On the road in a tour bus this week, the U.S. transportation secretary is spreading some bad news: The government's Highway Trust Fund is nearly broke. If allowed to run dry, that could set back or shut down projects across the country, force widespread layoffs of construction workers and delay needed repairs and improvements.


New York judge: Jurors can hear imam praise 9/11

NEW YORK (AP) — An Egyptian Islamic preacher's statements that "everybody was happy" when the World Trade Center was hit by airplanes can be heard by a jury sitting just blocks from the site of the Sept. 11 attacks, a judge ruled Tuesday.

Car accident killed SD girls missing since 1971

FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the South Dakota Attorney General’s Office shows a Studebaker with skeletal remains found in Brule Creek near Elk Point, S.D. Cheryl Miller and Pamella Jackson were last seen May 29, 1971, driving a 1960 Studebaker Lark on their way to a party. The attorney general, sheriffs from Union and Clay counties, and the Union County state's attorney scheduled a news conference Tuesday, April 15, 2014, in Elk Point where they plan plan to release test results and update the investigation into the 1971 disappearance of the two girls near Alcester. (AP Photo/South Dakota Attorney General’s Office, File) ELK POINT, S.D. (AP) — Two South Dakota girls on their way to an end-of-school-year party at a gravel pit in May 1971 drove off a country road and into a creek where their remains lay hidden until last fall when a drought brought their car into view, authorities said Tuesday.


Ga. judge won't stop new Vidalia onion rule

File- In this May 10, 2011 file photo, a fieldworker snips onion bulbs on a Vidalia onion farm in Lyons, Ga. Delbert Bland, who grows Vidalia onions on about 3,000 acres in southeast Georgia, won the first round of a court battle with Commissioner Gary Black when a Fulton County judge ruled March 19, 2014, the commissioner overstepped his authority by ordering that no Vidalia onions could be packed for shipping before April 21. Black is telling growers he still plans to enforce the restriction while the state appeals. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File) REIDSVILLE, Ga. (AP) — A Georgia judge Tuesday refused to intervene in a legal battle between a prominent Vidalia onion farmer and the state's agriculture commissioner over a new regulation aimed at keeping unripe onions from reaching store shelves.


City Leaders Work To Communicate Better

City officials, police, fire and other departments want to improve their relationships with one another.

Man accused of abusing 2 girls in 'Maidens Group'

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Authorities were searching Tuesday for a self-professed minister accused of sexually abusing at least two girls in a "Maidens Group" at his religious fellowship in rural Minnesota, where he told one victim she would remain a virgin because he was a "man of God," according to a criminal complaint.

Mother says police failed to track sex offenders

CORRECTS FIRST NAME TO STEVEN-This combination of undated photos from the Megan's Law website shows suspects, Steven Dean Gordon, 45, left, and Franc Cano, 27, who were arrested on Friday, April 11, 2014, on suspicion of killing four women in Orange County, Calif. Anaheim police said detectives in Santa Ana and Anaheim launched a joint investigation after the naked body of Jarrae Nykkole Estepp, 21, was found in the conveyor belt of a recycling plant last month. The probe led detectives to connect the men to her slaying, and the disappearance of three women who frequented a Santa Ana neighborhood known for drug dealing and prostitution. (AP Photo/Megan's Law) SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — A mother has blamed authorities for failing to do enough to track two sex offenders who are charged in the death of her daughter.


Ex-radiology tech filed false mammogram results

PERRY, Ga. (AP) — An ex-radiology technician accused of filing inaccurate mammogram results at a Georgia hospital has pleaded guilty to 10 counts of reckless conduct and a charge of computer forgery.

Handless cleric's own words to be used against him in U.S. trial

Abu Hamza al-Masri, the radical Islamist cleric facing U.S. terrorism charges, stands with his legal team in Manhattan federal court in New York By Joseph Ax NEW YORK (Reuters) - Prosecutors can use radical preacher Abu Hamza al-Masri's own inflammatory words against him during his trial in New York on terrorism-related charges, including praise for Osama bin Laden and for the September 11, 2001, attacks, a federal judge ruled on Tuesday. The decision came two days before opening statements are scheduled to take place in Manhattan federal court. Lawyers for Abu Hamza had argued that video and audio recordings of Abu Hamza justifying violence against non-Muslims would unfairly taint the jurors' emotions, making it impossible for him to have a fair verdict. But U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest said most of the tapes can be played for the jury to show Abu Hamza's state of mind and his willingness to provide aid to militant organizations.


Supremacist faces murder charges in Kansas deaths

Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Frazier Glenn Miller, appears at his arraignment in New Century, Kan., Tuesday, April 15, 2014. Cross is being charged for shootings that left three people dead at two Jewish community sites in suburban Kansas City on April 13. At right is Michelle Durrett, attorney with the public defender's office. (AP Photo/The Kansas City Star, David Eulitt, Pool) OVERLAND PARK, Kan. (AP) — A white supremacist charged in shootings that left three people dead at two Jewish community sites in suburban Kansas City was brought into a video conference room in a wheelchair Tuesday to make his first court appearance.


Judge blocks Massachusetts ban on painkiller

BOSTON (AP) — A federal judge has blocked Massachusetts from banning the powerful new painkiller Zohydro.

Americans increasingly prefer Democrats on healthcare: Reuters/Ipsos poll

Esparza sleeps in the arms of her grandfather as they wait in line at a health insurance enrollment event in Cudahy, California By Gabriel Debenedetti WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Americans increasingly think Democrats have a better plan for healthcare than Republicans, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll conducted after the White House announced that more people than expected had signed up for the "Obamacare" health plan. Nearly one-third of respondents in the online survey released on Tuesday said they prefer Democrats' plan, policy or approach to healthcare, compared to just 18 percent for Republicans. Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius stepped down last week after overseeing the law's rollout, including the HealthCare.gov website's tumultuous first weeks, when many users were unable to access the system to purchase or research their insurance options.


TSX higher after U.S. data, earnings; miners drop

Toronto Stock Exchange logo is seen in Toronto By John Tilak TORONTO (Reuters) - Canada's main stock index edged higher on Tuesday after upbeat U.S. economic data and corporate results helped offset worries about increasing instability in Ukraine and a sharp decline in gold-mining shares. Gains in shares of Coca-Cola Co and Johnson & Johnson after their earnings reports brightened the overall mood. The market brushed aside news that Russia declared Ukraine on the brink of civil war as Kiev said an "anti-terrorist operation" against pro-Moscow separatists was under way, with troops and armored personnel carriers seen near a flashpoint eastern town. Investor sentiment appeared to be turning positive after global stock markets fell last week on concerns about overextended valuations and worries about the U.S. Federal Reserve's monetary policy.


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With good content and quality links, you can attract more visitors located closer to home and increase your business' sales.

Behind Brazil's low unemployment, a quest for education

Brazilian students Morais, Thalles, Soares, Clara, Feitosa and Laura pose for a photo inside the study hall of a college preparatory school in Brasilia By Silvio Cascione BRASILIA (Reuters) - Brazil's growing prosperity is allowing teenagers to stay in school for longer instead of searching for jobs to support their families, boosting the country's long-term prospects but also causing some economic headaches. The shift helps explain one of the biggest debates among economists who follow Brazil - why unemployment remains at record lows of about 5 percent despite slow economic growth. A Reuters analysis of unemployment data found that the share of working-age people "not willing to work" in Brazil's six major cities has jumped by 6 percentage points to 39 percent since 2002. The case of Mariane Soares, 18, helps explain the shift.


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